Simon Versus the Homo Sapiens Agenda by Becky Albertalli

SimonVS_quote_NEWSimon Versus the Homo Sapiens Agenda by Becky Albertalli
Published by Balzer + Bray on April 7, 2015
Genres: [Young Adult] Contemporary, LGBTQ+
Pages: 320
Format: Hardcover
Source: Borrowed

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5 Stars, Completed April 24, 2015

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This fantastic book was on my goodreads TBR shelf for a while now, but after seeing Justin fanboy (yes, I just made “fanboy” a verb) in his review I had to get a hold of a copy as soon as I could.

Simon Spier is a Harry Potter fanboy, music enthusiast, theater boy, and Oreo addict, but among these many characteristics, he’s also a closet gay. Simon has a quirky family and close group of friends, however the only person that knows his secret is his somewhat online boyfriend, Blue. He and Blue have been emailing each other for months after Blue’s post about loneliness on the school’s tumblr, Creeksecrets, an internet outlet used by the student body to post anonymous confessions and secrets. The book begins with Martin Addison logging on the school computer and accidentally discovering Simon’s sexual identity and his secret email correspondence with the careful Blue. Martin also screenshots the emails and blackmails Simon into helping Martin get together with Simon’s close friend, Abby. (I hope that wasn’t too confusing to follow…) From there several misunderstandings arise and Simon’s world is a pandemonium.

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The Glass Castle by Jeannette Wall

71VBpx0qsmLThe Glass Castle by Jeannette Walls
Published by Scribner on January 17, 2006
Genres: [Adult] Nonfiction, Autobiography, Memoir
Pages: 288
Format: Paperback
Source: Gift

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5 Stars, Completed February 27, 2015

– highlight* to view SPOILERS – 

*Quick warning: If you’re using WordPress’ Reader the white text will remain as visible black text and you’ll see spoilers regardless of whether you highlight the text or not. Make sure to read this post on my actual blog for the white text to appear and therefore the spoilers to be concealed; this is the only way for this method to be effective. Sorry for the inconvenience!

I’m not sure where to start. I recently made a new friend this last year, and she recommended me this book. After finally picking it up, I understood why it had stellar reviews and was on the The New York Times bestseller for a good 2 years.

The Glass Castle is a memoir written by former MSNBC gossip columnist Jeannette Wells, which narrates her unconventional upbringing and leads up to her success as a writer. In ways the book was simple and complex. Walls begins her story by describing one evening when she sees her homeless mother picking trash on the streets while she is on her way to a fancy party. When she sees her mother begin to look up towards her direction, she quickly bends down in her seat, in shame, hoping that should would pass unrecognized. Later she meets with her mom at a restaurant, slightly embarrassed by her mother’s appearance, and asks her mother how she should disclose about her family to her friends and colleagues. And her mother replies, “Just tell the truth, that’s simple enough.”

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Unbroken by Laura Hillenbrand

unbroken-cover_custom-0a55df2637ae96369dd0302be5ad4de816c6b0abUnbroken by Laura Hillenbrand
Published by Random House on November 16, 2010
Genres: [Adult] Biography, Historical Nonfiction
Pages: 473
Format: Hardcover
Source: Purchased

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5 Stars, Completed February 12, 2015

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Unbroken is a WWII biography of Olympic runner and American prisoner of war survivor, Louie Zamperini. Hillenbrand beautifully crafts this story by, suitably, splitting Louie’s life into parts. The first part explores Louie boyhood full of mischief, troublemaking, and rebellion to the beginnings of his track career (Olympics included). The second part delves into his time during his enlistment in the U.S. Army Air Corps and adjustment to life at war. The third goes in great detail about the B-26 bomber’s crash, the 47 days lost at sea, and his hardships as a POW at the Japanese prison camps. And in the fourth and final part, Hillenbrand gives the readers a glimpse of Louie’s struggle of adjusting to civilian life after the end of the war and how he finds an end to the psychological war his mind battles long after the Second World War.

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